Turtle Tracks on Folly Beach 2001

TracksDateEggsLocationExpected
Hatch Date
(using 50-day lapse)
%
Hatched

Nest #1

May 15

140
(-3)

"1545"-E
Washout

July 4
First emergence
July 17
(63 days)

121 of 137
87%
THEY'RE BAAA-CK!!   OK, ok ... ONE is back, but she laid a HUGE clutch of 140 eggs that was relocated from below the spring tide wrack line to a more elevated location just beyond the next to the last walkover in the Washout. Many thanks to Carole for locating the clutch and doing all the careful work of moving the eggs. The season is officially underway at Folly! Above July 21 high tides.

ANA-A

May 16

 

1513-E
Washout

July 5

 
 
ANA?? What's that? "Aborted nesting attempt." Sometimes called a "false crawl" or "non-nesting emergence," this is when the sea turtle begins a crawl up the beach, but instead of nesting, makes a U-turn back to the ocean. An aborted nesting attempt is usually the result of disturbances on the beach or poor nesting conditions. In this case, the turtle crawled up to, then along the rocks at the Washout where she turned twice only to encounter more rocks before heading back to the ocean. She'll try again within 3-4 nights (or may have laid nest #2).

Nest #2

May 16

in situ

1713-E

July 5
First emergence
July 20
(65 days)

115 of 134
86%
About 6 a.m. Sunnie spotted this crawl into a small dune between two sand fences. Nesting appeared to have taken place, but the crew had no luck finding the eggs. Fortunately, this nest arrived just in time to be demo site for annual DNR training. Charlotte Hope made it look mighty easy when she found the eggs on the 2d probe!! July 21 high tide overwash - minimal.

Nest #3

May 22

100

Co. Park-W

July 11
First emergence
July 21
(60 days)

85 of 100
85%
A nest of 100 eggs was relocated from a low area that floods to a dune next to Pelican Watch shelter. The County Park is a very critical area for nests. Most will need to be relocated because of the high water table (eggs at the bottom of nest sit in water) and frequency of tide overwash and erosion. We're fortunate to have 3 volunteers who will share the important monitoring of this area. Many thanks to Kara, Lynn, and Linda for their vigilence -- you're off to a great start! Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #4

May 22

in situ

720-E

July 11
First emergence
July 19
(58 days)

43 of 123
35%
Lisa found this crawl -- a welcome sight after finding a stranding (dead turtle) on Saturday. Carol reported that nesting field signs strongly indicated the presence of eggs, but they weren't found. The nest area is between the mean high tide and spring high tide lines. The eggs would have been moved if located to minimize the effects of spring tide overwashes. It will be closely watched! July 21 high tide inundation: 23 hatchlings emerged before flooding; 67 hatchlings drowned before emergence; 7 live hatchlings released.

Nest #5

May 25

in situ

1771-E

July 14
First emergence
July 30
(66 days)

78 of 86
91%
Sunnie found another great crawl into the dune line and she, Broxann, and Bob found the eggs! There were actually two crawls -- one headed into groin pilings then back to the ocean, the other about 20 yards west into the dune where the turtle nested. We're glad she tried again! The nest is on the back slope of the dune, so careful attention will be needed at hatching time to make sure that house lights stay off and the little turtles head in the right direction. Great job, Crew! July 18: "guidance system" added to discourage wandering in vegetation; July 21 high tide overwash - minimal; July 23: indentation noted (hopeful sign of hatching readiness).

ANA-B

May 25

 

Co. Park-W

July 14

 
 
Kara called in an aborted nesting attempt in the park Friday morning. These are very important sightings. They're a nesting turtle's "broadcast" that says "I'm ready! I'm looking!" and may be followed within four nights by her return to lay eggs.

Nest #6

May 26

in situ

609-W

July 15
First emergence
July 21
(56 days)

68 of 113
60%
A very long wandering crawl greeted Lynn and Craig this morning. It led to nest #6 -- eggs confirmed! This is beginning to look like a bumper crop season for Folly! July 21 high tide inundation: emergency relocation. 14 found dead; 32 live hatchlings released during relocation; all viable eggs (-24 undeveloped) reburied for hatching.

Nest #7

May 28

in situ

1583-E

July 17
First emergence
July 23
(56 days)

135 of 142
95%
The nesting loggerhead arrived just after high tide (evidenced by her short incoming track) and didn't leave the beach until just before 6 a.m. when Broxann & guardian Sabine saw the tracks. The photo shows Sabine about 25' seaward of the nest site. Behind Sabine is the loggerhead's VERY long return track leading through a gully then on to the ocean. She spent a lot of time on the beach creating a classic nest site. Broxann quickly confirmed the eggs and Nest #7. This exact location has attracted a nesting loggerhead for at least the past 3 years. Makes you wonder! Same female? Nest mates twenty years ago? Who knows! Unfortunately it's a troublesome site for hatchlings because it sits between the staircases to two houses and in the bright glow of a streetlight. Measures will be taken to reduce the lighting hazards in mid-July. We want to ensure future site reuse! July 21 & 22 high tide overwash; nest "caved in" on morning of July 23 (hopeful 1st emergence).

Morris Island

May 29

in situ

Morris Island

July 18

 
 
Many thanks to the folks who boated over to Morris Island and found a nest there at the top edge of a dune behind an inland marsh flat. A large tire is embedded in the sand near the nest. We'll attempt to monitor its hatching and hopefully be able to inventory the nest even though Morris Island isn't officially part of Folly's "watch." It's great to know for sure that turtles are nesting there!

Nest #8

May 31

in situ

1561-E

July 20
First emergence
July 30
(60 days)

103 of 111
93%
Another near miss. Again the nesting loggerhead arrived just after high tide and reentered the ocean minutes before Bob walked by and saw her beautiful signature in the sand. Eggs were confirmed and Nest #8 is marked near the rocks and above the spring tide wrack at the very end of the Washout. Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #9

June 1

139

1201-E

July 21
First emergence unknown.

63 of 139
45%
Turtle nested in a low spot in the wrack line just to the left of the 12th Street walkover. The eggs were moved to a safer elevation in the dune line to the right of the walkover. 139 beauties! May they grow strong and hatch in 55 days! Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #10

June 3

in situ

1615-E

July 23
First emergence
July 29
(57 days)

111 of 117
95%
To a puzzled crew on Sunday morning, it appeared to be the season's 3d aborted nesting attempt, but by Monday evening, it was Nest #10 ... Sarah's Nest. Very late Saturday night (or very early Sunday morning), Sarah watched a large loggerhead whose carapace was heavily encrusted with barnacles and glowing with phosphorescence, methodically dig a nest, deposit a clutch of eggs, conceal the nest, and slowly crawl back to the ocean. Fortunately for the hatchlings to come, Sarah was just as persistent in getting the news of this nest to the crew, finally reaching us on Monday via phone messages and e-mail. We're very grateful to Sarah, Fergus, and Woo for meeting us to confirm her sighting and tell her wonderful story. July 21 high tides eroded the front of this nest site; eggs an inch away, 1 empty shell found; sand added to reestablish front edge of dune. July 22: repair held during next 2 high tides.

Nest #11

June 5

131

Co. Park-W

July 23
First emergence unknown.

128 of 131
98%
Another save at the County Park! Many thanks to Lynn and Earle for their find and help with moving 131 eggs to a much safer location near the Pelican Watch shelter. Protecting the park nests takes special vigilence and effort. Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #12

June 5

94

531-E

July 23
First emergence August 2
(58 days)

84 of 94
89%
Lola! All those early mornings paid off today! Lola found the tracks, probed, found and moved the nest which had been laid below the spring wrack. 94 eggs were carefully relocated to a nearby dune for safekeeping. Above July 21 high tides.

ANA-C

June 7

 

1315-E

July 27

 
 
A crawl, maybe a nest, but no egg chamber found. Calling this one an aborted nesting attempt. Not marked, but near Nest #13's relocation site (laid same day). Area will be closely monitored near hatch time.

Nest #13

June 7

154 (-1)

1315-E

July 27
First emergence August 5
(59 days)

146 of 154
95%
Some mornings you just KNOW there are turtles on the beach. Bob spotted ONE line of tracks that led into the rocks at the beginning of the Washout. Mom sea turtle was still there! She was busy covering her nest by throwing sand left and right, then turned and struggled over a group of rocks to begin her long crawl back to the ocean. She was HUGE and left the largest known clutch so far this year -- 154 eggs! She selected a precarious location known to flood, so the nest was moved to next best site at 1315-E near the tracks of aborted nesting attempt (ANA-C above). Above July 21 high tides.

ANA-D

June 7

 

CGS-E

July 27

 
 
Dave found these tracks on the north end of the island past the lighthouse. He and Barbara determined it to be an aborted nesting attempt. Marked with stake for continued observation.

Nest #14

June 10

90

CGS-E/BTG

July 30
First emergence August 8
(59 days)

85 of 90
94%
Oops ... #14 is being assigned a few days out of order (actually laid 3 days after Nests 15 & 16). This turtle was reportedly still on the beach between 7-8 a.m. Sunday. She laid 90 eggs at the foot a tall dune between the two rock groins (DBTG!). Chesney and Walker carefully relocated the nest to a higher elevation nearby to prevent the eggs from becoming water logged. (BTG = location "between two groins") Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #15

June 7

136

915-W

July 27
First emergence August 4
(58 days)

134 of 136
99%
Lynn B found tracks and egg chamber and moved the 136 eggs to a higher location to prevent flooding. Sand crab activity was noted here, so Marty has added a sand crab trap. It quickly captured a curious visitor who will not return. Many thanks to Lynn and Marty for a great job! Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #16

June 7

in situ

1001-W

July 27
First emergence unknown.

100 of 117
85%
Marty found another crawl just 4 houses away from #15. This was FIFTH crawl of the morning -- a Folly record! Excellent nest site selection by momma loggerhead, so it is in situ -- where she put it with eggs confirmed.

ANA-E

June 10

 

1509-E

July 30

 
 
An aborted nesting attempt in the Washout near the second walkover. Tracks led into rocks and back to ocean again. It's possible that this turtle preferred a site at the east end of the island (see #14 above).

Nest #17

June 14

139

723-W

August 3
First emergence August 9
(56 days)

135 of 139
97%
Another walk on the west side! Lynn found and moved a nest of 139 eggs moved to a higher, safer location.

ANA-F

June 16

 

1505-E

August 5

 
 
Another aborted nesting attempt in the Washout. Tracks turned around mid-beach, then right back to the ocean again. Hopefully she'll be back to nest somewhere else on Folly.

ANA-G

June 17

 

907-E

August 6

 
 
The only things we know for sure is that a turtle walked into and along the dune, walked back to the ocean, and we dug more holes than she did. One uprooted plant was found, but no egg chamber. It may be there, well-concealed beneath very powdery sand. Though not numbered as a nest, the site has been marked so that we can keep an eye on it through hatching time. Many thanks to Lisa for her patience and perseverance.

Nest #18

June 19

84

"1545"-E

August 8
First emergence August 19
(61 days)

80 of 84
95%
Another low-lying nest in the Washout. Bob took care of moving the 84 eggs to a safer location next to Nest #1. Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #19

June 19

81

1639-E

August 8
First emergence August 16
(58 days)

75 of 81
93%
Sunnie spotted this one, probed, found, and moved the eggs, laid in a high tide wash area, to a safer location. Great work, Sunnie! The photo shows the beginning of the probing process with the nest in the foreground. There's a small bit of uprooted green plant on top of the nest area -- a very indicative field sign that says "there are eggs here." Above July 21 high tides.

ANA-H

June 19

 

Co. Park-W

August 8

 
 
The field signs were pretty convincing, but the egg chamber wasn't found. This is a questionable false crawl near the vegetation line past the County Park concessions. A marker was left to watch the area near hatch time.

Nest #20

June 20

128

Co. Park-W

August 9
First emergence August 12
(53 days)

119 of 128
93%
This nest may confirm yesterday's "false crawl" in the same area. Lynn found and moved the 128 eggs to a much safer spot near the Pelican Watch shelter. Above July 21 high tides.   Update 8/12:  hatchlings disoriented by lights at the park -- dozens rescued from parking lot by park staff, Linda, and Craig. "Lights Out" will be closely monitored by crew, park, and DNR.

Nest #21

June 20

in situ

CGS-E/WBFG

August 9
First emergence August 24
(65 days)

84 of 149
56%
Two sisters and their families had a wonderful learning experience watching a loggerhead sea turtle lay this nest! They were joined by Cindy, Brock and Jenna who just happened to walk by at the right time. Cindy, now teaching in West Africa and Venezuela, had taught science to some of the families' children a few years ago! What a great gathering for this rarely witnessed event on the east end of Folly. (WBFG = location "way before 1st groin"; about midway between last house and 1st groin) July 21 high tide inundation: nest swamped (heavy washover), but intact.

Nest #22

June 23

111(-1)

Co. Park-W

August 12
First emergence August 12
(50 days)

107 of 111
96%
ANOTHER County Park nest! We're so lucky to have such dedicated crew watching that area. Eggs were moved to a higher location near Pelican Watch shelter. Above July 21 high tides.

ANA-I

June 27

 

801-W

August 16

 
 
Great to see even a "false crawl" after 4 days of no activity. Hopefully we'll confirm a new nest tomorrow.

Nest #23

June 28

in situ

CGS-E/LCGSRd

August 17
First emergence unknown

52 of 83
63%
Barbara confirmed this new nest! Momma turtle did a good job of selecting one of the only high spots above the wrack on the very fragile northeast edge of Folly. Nest site has a choice view of the lighthouse and Morris Island. (LCGSRd = location "left of Coast Guard Station Road") Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #24

June 29

86

1023-W

August 18
First emergence unknown

85 of 86
99%
Like several of the nests moved this year, this is a relatively small clutch of 86 eggs. It may be an indication that more neophyte females (first timers) are nesting this year. These would typically be smaller turtles producing fewer eggs.

Nest #25


June 30

in situ

1627-E

August 19
First emergence August 22
(53 days)

61 of 88 moved 1 week prior to hatching
69%
Overall 64 of 101
63%
Many thanks to the Partsch Family from Johnstown and Gettysburg area, Pennsylvania, for joining the crew in safeguarding this nest which was laid in Gypsy House's footpath. An extra, taller enclosure was put around the nest site to serve as an early warning system to those using the pathway. The family had a full indoctrination into the life cycle of Folly turtles through this very welcome confirmed nest and the untimely stranding of a dead adult turtle just 4 houses away. We're especially indebted to the Partsch men for taking over the grave digging operation and burying the turtle. Thank you! Hope you had a safe trip home and we'll be looking for you next year! July 21 high tide inundation: all stakes washed away; approx. 7" sand depth gone; hope that nest remains; area restaked.   Update 8/12:  PRESENCE & LOCATION OF EGGS RECONFIRMED & RESTAKED BY BROXANN!   Update 8/17:  Nest excavated and 88 viable eggs moved to new, higher location in dune to escape high tide inundation and erosion. Thank you, Jessica, for supplying the bucket for this relocation!

Nest #26

July 1

in situ
(-1)

619-W

August 20
First emergence August 26
(56 days)

71 of 72
99%
A great West side location. Eggs confirmed and remain where the loggerhead left them.

ANA-J

July 1

 

Co. Park-W

August 20

 
 
"False crawl" in the County Park. Hopefully she'll come back to Folly, but we know that Kiawah will welcome her, too.

Nest #27

July 2

in situ

Summer Place-E

August 21
No emergence; did not hatch.

Eggs unaccounted for due to July 21 erosion
0%
3 a.m. call: turtle digging near last houses on east end. Nest found and eggs confirmed! Thanks, Barbara! July 21 high tide inundation: emergency relocation (east of Summer Place). MANY THANKS to whoever called DNR Hotline to report high tide damage and to Barbara & Ned for rushing to the rescue.

Nest #28?
(eggs unconfirmed; no hatching indicators; ANA)

July 2

in situ

1023-W

August 21
Considered ANA
after hatch time lapsed w/ no signs of hatching
Many thanks to the woman who called in this nest! The site is very close to #24, and even though the eggs were unconfirmed, all other signs indicate a probable nest.

Nest #29

July 4

141(-2)

CGS-E/RCGSRd

August 23
First emergence August 31
(58 days)

131 of 141
93%
Dave spotted large tractor-like tracks about 25 yards north of the end of Coast Guard Station Road. Because the nest was in a low spot, successful egg development was threatened by the Folly north end's high water table. Barbara and Dave relocated this large nest about 50 yards away on a higher drier site, ensuring a much better chance for live hatchlings. Exciting way to start the 4th of July! (RCGSRd = location "right of Coast Guard Station Road") Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #30

July 6

in situ

601-W

August 25
First emergence August 27
(52 days)

36 of 89
38%
West side gets more action! Craig found the crawl and Lynn confirmed the eggs. Nest #30 remains in situ in a good location just beyond the 6th street walkover. Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #31?
(eggs unconfirmed; no hatching indicators; ANA)

July 6

in situ

611-W

August 25
Considered ANA
after hatch time lapsed w/ no signs of hatching
9:30 p.m. call from DNR Dispatcher Tiffany: turtle just left the beach near 611-West. Craig went to investigate and found a classic nest site -- straight tracks into a high dune, body pit complete with uprooted vegetation, thrown sand, and clearly defined crescent where she turned to go back to the ocean. But could we find the eggs? Well ... no. Are we sure they're there? Oh, yeah. Are we happy to accept the mystery and wait for the nest to reveal itself in about 55 days? As long as the site is safe (it is) and clearly marked (it is), we can happily appreciate the momma loggerhead's superior concealment skills! Many thanks to the folks who called DNR, to Tiffany, and to Craig for fast action on identifying this nest! Two nests within 100' of each other in about 24 hours -- the West side is busy!

Nest #32

July 8

in situ

1691-E

August 27
First emergence September 2
(56 days)

107 of 119
90%
Sunnie, Broxann, & Bob find 'em again! This turtle clearly arrived just after the previous high tide (11 p.m.) and left about an hour later. She laid her eggs, then looped through the dune a bit, and headed back home. Above July 21 high tides.

ANA-K HATCHED
to become
Nest #51

July 8

in situ

1577-E

August 27
First emergence probably August 28
(51 days)

103 of 130
79%
Looong crawls in and out and a circular wandering over and down the other side of the dune. What WAS she looking for? The turtle never appeared to have stopped moving, but we're still haunted. A dated stake was left to mark the area; no number. If there's a nest tomorrow we'll feel easier about calling this one an aborted nesting attempt (ANA).   Update 8/29: Noticed tracks on dune face; large maze of tracks on flat dune top led back to horizontal slot opening between two clumps of sea grass on the far left of mom's original crawl area. Some disorientation of hatchlings believed to have been caused by nest opening to the side which faced a 15' run of sand across the top of the dune. Most tracks led to ocean side of dune; a few (6-8) to back dune vegetation. If we had been able to locate the eggs when the mom nested, we would have been able to guide hatchlings away from backyards. Inventory revealed a large nest of 130 eggs, 80% of which hatched. A good result for what is now Nest #51.

Nest #33

July 10

94

1561-E

August 29
First emergence September 2
(54 days)

88 of 94
94%
Interesting crawl at the end of the Washout. This loggerhead began digging her egg chamber below the Spring high tide line, but evidently didn't like the location, and moved somewhat higher into the wrack where she dug another nest and laid 94 eggs. Because of the flooding potential of mid-August storms, we moved the nest higher into the dune line nearby. Thanks to Carole for finding the eggs and to our patient visitor from West Palm who waited out our own dry runs at locating the nest. He was thrilled to finally see a sea turtle egg! Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #34

July 10

in situ

601-E

August 29
First emergence unknown.

80 of 82
98%
Lisa B found this crawl into a dune crest and carefully protected the nest until the eggs could be located. The traffic seems to picking up! This is GREAT! July 21 high tide overwash - minimal.

Nest #35

July 11

in situ

1027-W

August 30
First emergence unknown.

38 of 130
29%
A return to the West side. Great location just before the County Park! Eggs confirmed and left where the loggerhead laid them.

ANA-L

July 11

 

730-W

August 30

 
 
Tracks of an aborted nesting attempt ("false crawl" or "non-nesting emergence") verified.

ANA-M

July 11

 

700/800-E

August 30

 
 
Confusing and inconclusive tracks in the 700-E block. We'll need to patrol this area during hatchout time to make sure undiscovered nests are accounted for.

Nest #36

July 12

in situ

417-E

August 31
First emergence unknown.

83 of 84
99%
Another crawl found by Lisa and in another good location. Eggs confirmed. May have been the return trip for some of yesterday's non-nesters. Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #37

July 12

113(-1)

Co.Park-W

August 31

98 of 113
87%
Another busy multi-nest morning. We're not complaining -- keep 'em coming! This nest was laid low and very deep -- susceptible to flooding from tides and water table. It's been moved to the dunes near Pelican Watch shelter. Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #38?
(eggs unconfirmed; no hatching indicators; ANA)

July 13

in situ

1691-E

September 1
Considered ANA
after hatch time lapsed w/ no signs of hatching
Whoa! Remember Nest #32? Well, here's another one that Broxann found in almost the same spot! Too soon to be the same turtle, but interesting to think they may be "family." Eggs are unconfirmed, but nesting signs were convincing enough to make us stake #38. Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #39

July 14

113

CGS-E(N>SW)

September 2
First emergence September 9
(57 days)

99 of 113
96%
Traffic is picking up in Coast Guard Station area. These tracks were spotted in the northern stretch of the CGS area where the water table is quite high. 113 eggs were relocated in a safer nest site to the southwest. Whata week! 6 confirmed nests + several ANAs. This may be our peak. Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #40

July 15

95

CGS-E(B2dG)

September 3
First emergence unknown.

91 of 95
96%
A new nest -- what a wonderful counterpoint to having a stranding this morning. Eggs were laid at the eroding foot of a high dune between the 1st and 2d groins at the "point" end of Folly. Bob found them quickly and Broxann gently placed each one into the new nest that she created on a low, vegetated dune nearby. We enjoyed sharing this one with Sara and Heather from the St. Louis area who had been thrilled by the Aquarium's turtle exhibit, but never expected to be able to involved with a nest relocation. Sara's planning a marine biology career! Above July 21 high tides.

ANA-N

July 19

 

1669-E

September 7

 
 
Broxann spotted this crawl that went up to and along a low dune. The egg chamber was not located and nesting signs were not conclusive enough to warrant a number. Just in case, we'll watch this area closely for any signs of hatching from early-to-mid September. At July 21 high tide mark; experienced some overwash.

Nest #41

July 19

96

1581-E

September 7
First emergence September 12
(55 days)

44 of 96
46%
Eggs were quickly found in the low-lying nest and moved to a new chamber in the dune. Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #42

July 19

in situ

1107-E

September 7
First emergence September 11
(54 days)

90 of 100
90%
4-generations gathered to share in welcoming this nest to Folly. They'll guard it carefully just where the turtle laid it -- in the pathway to their beach house. Great memory for US in meeting this family from Augusta, GA. Many thanks for your interest and concern. Above July 21 high tides.

Nest #43

July 22

in situ

1667-E

September 10
First emergence September 11
(51 days)

103 of 114
89%
Broxann saw one set of tracks and followed them into the top of a dune. No loggerhead there, but an extensive nest site. The tracks were her return tracks. She had ridden the very high July 21/22 tide to the dune line -- a Folly surfer girl. Her emergence tracks (probably only a few steps), had already been erased by the tide. She chose a GREAT location for her nest. Carole confirmed the eggs!

Nest #44

July 23

89 (small)

913-W

September 11
First emergence September 13
(52 days)

79 of 89
96%
This turtle managed to manuever between sand fencing and private walkovers to lay a nest in a low lying mound of sand. 89 small eggs were moved to a high dune at 917-E, next to nest #15. It was good to meet the women from Indiana and Kristin as we raced the high tide.

Nest #45

July 23

in situ

613-W

September 11
First emergence September 13
(52 days)

72 of 75
96%
It was fun sharing this one with a family from Huntsville. They had been lucky enough to see hatchlings at #6 the night before and today -- an egg. They're hoping to see a momma turtle before they leave. As Dad said, they're learning in rewind. Many thanks to Craig for staking off this site and #44 -- it was a tremendous help. Eggs confirmed, Kristin!

Nest #46

July 24

116

1583-E

September 12
First emergence September 12
(50 days)

104 of 116
90%
One set of tracks leading to the dune line. She was still on the beach! Tammie was sitting near her, quietly watching as she threw sand to cover her nest then turn to cross the deep wrack and begin her long crawl back home. Awesome and humbling way to start the day. The eroded base of the dune was not a safe location for this nest. Her eggs were relocated in a new nest on the slant of the dune side.

Nest #47

? (wild)

in situ

815-E

July 27
First emergence
July 27 ?
(Estimated 58 days)

114 of 129
88%
A "wild" nest not found until hatchout. Using 58 days as an approximate length of incubation, it was probably laid on May 30th. Always GREAT to have more nests!

Nest #48

August 4

65

411-W

September 23
First emergence September 28
(55 days)

63 of 65
97%
The mommas aren't finished yet! A newly laid nest of 65 eggs relocated to higher, safer sand. The small size of this clutch is pretty good evidence that this momma sea turtle IS finished for the season. She'll be off for well-deserved R&R in the feeding grounds and will hopefully nest at Folly again in a couple of years. Safe journey.

Nest #49

? (wild)

in situ

Co. Park-W

Hatched before August 4

53 of 54
98%
A "wild" nest was identified "at the absolute last spit of sand all of the way down river." Linda found eggs on the surface and an investigation revealed 53 empty eggs and 1 undeveloped egg. Best guess is that this nest was laid early, hatched before the July 21st floods, then tide eroded sand and exposed what was left. A lucky find! Thanks, Linda and Carole!

Nest #50

? (wild)

in situ

1655-E

August 5
First emergence
August 5

96 of 150
64%
Another "wild" one -- not found until hatchout. Using 60 days as an approximate length of incubation, it was probably laid on or just before June 6th. It's exciting to account for more nests and successful hatchlings! We're indebted to Danielle, Kevin, and Andrew for reporting this nest and for being on the lookout for more hatchlings. THANK YOU!

ANA-K HATCHED
to become
Nest #51

July 8

in situ

1577-E

August 27
First emergence probably August 28
(51 days)

103 of 130
79%
Looong crawls in and out and a circular wandering over and down the other side of the dune. What WAS she looking for? The turtle never appeared to have stopped moving, but we're still haunted. A dated stake was left to mark the area; no number. If there's a nest tomorrow we'll feel easier about calling this one an aborted nesting attempt (ANA).   Update 8/29: Noticed tracks on dune face; large maze of tracks on flat dune top led back to horizontal slot opening between two clumps of sea grass on the far left of mom's original crawl area. Some disorientation of hatchlings believed to have been caused by nest opening to the side which faced a 15' run of sand across the top of the dune. Most tracks led to ocean side of dune; a few (6-8) to back dune vegetation. If we had been able to locate the eggs when the mom nested, we would have been able to guide hatchlings away from backyards. Inventory revealed a large nest of 130 eggs, 80% of which hatched. A good result for what is now Nest #51.